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Archive for July, 2019

FSSAI’s new norms ban using veg oil with more than 25% TPCs for frying

26,July, 2019 Comments off

FSSAI, through a draft notification issued recently, has fixed the Total Polar Compounds (TPCs) for unused vegetable oils / fats at not more than 15%. Further, according to the authority, used vegetable oil/fat having developed TPCs more than 25% shall not be used for frying.
According to the notification, "In the Food Safety and Standards (Prohibition and Restrictions on Sales) Regulations, 2011, in Regulation 2.3, in Sub-Regulation 2.3.15, after Clause 7, following clause shall be inserted namely:
“8. The Total Polar Compounds in unused/fresh vegetable oil/fat shall not be more than 15%. Used vegetable oil/fat having developed Total Polar Compounds more than 25% shall not be used.” Objections or suggestions with regard to the draft can be sent to FSSAI by August 14, 2019.
Several food inspectors have received complaints in recent years regarding the repeated use of cooking oils by FBOs, which prompted FSSAI to take further action in this regard.
Further, to streamline the standards for cooking oils, the regulator observed that the regulations had no particular provisions to limit the use of cooking oils. Also, if the TPC of the oil is higher than 25% then it is considered to be unsafe for human consumption.
Commenting on the new regulations, Anuja Laghate, executive assistant to MD from Muenzer Bharat, said, “The draft notification by FSSAI (Food Safety and Standards Authority of India) is really a good initiative. The guidelines are stringent. The disposal of oil in an unorganised manner by FBOs should be stopped. If we have used the oil 3-4 times, then the same oil cannot be used for frying again because the TPC will be more than 25%. Even if FBOs add fresh oil in the reused oil, the TPC level will definitely come down but then it is not good for health.”
She added, “Also, the local vendors do not know where to dispose the reused oil so they end up disposing in drains or sell it. So, we as a company make sure that the reused oil is not entering the food chain again. Our company helps the FBOs to dispose this used cooking oil and convert it into biodiesel.”
Throwing further light, Laghate said, “The guidelines may not reach all the FBOs so companies like Muenzer Bharat and others will train the FBOs and we make them understand about the TPC level and the health hazard faced by the people if we reuse the oil for days.”
Meanwhile, Dr K D Yadav, sr VP (technical), AAK Kamani Pvt. Ltd, said, “It is a good move by FSSAI. But the implementation of the move will be a difficult task. If FSSAI wants to implement it, they should come up with an accurate method. Although, there are different test tubes available to check the TPC level of various oils in the market, but one test tube is specifically for that particular oil which is not correct. Pouring down the money, India is net importer of oil/fats.”
He added, “It is a big challenge. The method should be validated. It should not be a big point of dispute and harassment for the industry.”

Categories: NEWS

FSSAI gazette notifies standards for coconut water, dried oregano, mint

26,July, 2019 Comments off

 

FSSAI has gazette notified the Food Safety and Standards Regulations, 2019, for food product standards and food additives, wherein standards for coconut water, dried oregano, dried mint and dried rosemary are included. This is the second amendment to the particular standards.
“All food business operators shall comply with all the provisions of these regulations by July 1, 2020,” said the notification.
According to the notification, in Regulation 2.3, related to fruit and vegetable products, –
    (a) In Sub-regulation 2.3.51, in Clause (1), for Sub-clause (e), the following sub-clause shall be substituted, namely:
“(e) Coconut water, maltodextrin and sodium caseinate may be added. The product shall have a characteristic colour, flavour and odour. It may be processed by heat, in an appropriate manner, before or after being hermetically sealed in a container, so as to prevent spoilage.”
(b) In Sub-regulation 2.3.52, in Clause (1), for Sub-clause (e), the following clause shall be substituted, namely:
“(e) Coconut water, maltodextrin and sodium caseinate may be added. The product shall have a characteristic colour, flavour and odour. It may be processed by heat, in an appropriate manner, before or after being hermetically sealed in a container, so as to prevent spoilage.”
The notification also guides about Section 2.9 regarding salt, spices and condiments, which includes oregano, mint and rosemary, amongst others.
Commenting on the notification, Suresh Annapure, joint commissioner, Amravati, Maharashtra, said, “With this draft, new standards for coconut water, dried oregano, dried mint and dried rosemary will be implemented. FSSAI has done a good job, making it easy to understand the ingredients.”
He added, “Our team will make sure all FBOs (food business operators) comply with the same within the given time duration.”
Giving details on the new norms, Milind Deshpande, assistant commissioner (food), FDA Maharashtra, Nagpur, stated, “Earlier, there was no specific standards for coconut water and fruits which come under Appendix B.”
He added, “If any company wants to sell coconut water, it has to know what are the limits for maltodextrin and sodium caseinate or what quantity has been mentioned as permissible. Canni seal is a preservative process which helps to preserving fruits.”
According to the notification, dried oregano whole means the leaves of the Origanum genus, species and sub-species, excluding Origanum majorana, belonging to the Lamiaceae (Labiatae) family. The colour of the dried leaves shall be light greyish green to olive green. It shall be free from yellow or brown leaf, and from dust and fine particles.
It shall have a characteristic odour and flavour. It shall be free from mustiness and other foreign flavours. It shall be free from living and dead insects, moulds, insect fragments and rodent contamination visible to the naked eye.
For dried mint, the notification said, “Dried mint means dried leaves or broken or crushed leaves of Mentha spicata Linnaeus syn/Mentha viridis Linnaeus. It shall have characteristic odour and flavour, and shall be free from mustiness and other foreign flavours. It shall be free from living insects, moulds, dead insects, insect fragments and rodent contamination visible to the naked eye.”
Further, the notification described dried rosemary as the dried leaves of the species Rosmarinus officinalis L, belonging to the family Lamiaceae. It shall have characteristic colour, odour and flavour. It shall be free from any foreign taste or odour, including rancidity or mustiness. It shall be free from living and dead insects, moulds, insect fragments and rodent contamination visible to the naked eye.

Categories: NEWS

Health ministry imposes ban on manufacture of Colistin and formulation

26,July, 2019 Comments off

The Ministry of Health and Family Welfare has decided to ban drug Colistin and its formulation, which is commonly given to the animals producing food. The ministry, in this regard, has issued a gazette notification, which prohibits the manufacturing, sale and distribution of Colistin with immediate effect.
The notification stated that it was brought to the notice of the Central Government that the use of the drug Colistin and its formulations for food producing animals, poultry, aqua farming and animal feed supplements is likely to involve risk to human beings.
Further, the Drugs Technical Advisory Board has considered the said matter and recommended for prohibiting the said drug and its formulations.
“Therefore, in exercise of powers conferred by section 26A of the Drugs and Cosmetics Act, 1940 (23 of 1940), the Central Government hereby? (a) prohibits the manufacture, sale and distribution of the following drug with immediate effect, namely Colistin and its formulations for food producing animals, poultry, aqua farming and animal feed supplements; and (b) directs that the manufacturer of Colistin and its formulations shall label the container of the drug and mention the words, ‘Not to be used in food producing animals, poultry, aqua farming and animal feed supplements’ in a conspicuous manner on the package insert and promotional literature of the said drug and its formulations,” said the notification.
Welcoming the move, Centre for Science and Environment (CSE) said that the health ministry’s move is expected to help regulate antibiotic misuse in these animals and contain antimicrobial resistance (AMR).
“We welcome the health ministry’s move to ban colistin use in food-producing animals. It will help preserve this last-resort antibiotic for humans and save lives from deadly antibiotic-resistant infections. It will go a long way in fighting antibiotic resistance,” said Chandra Bhushan, deputy director general, CSE.

Categories: NEWS

FDA Maharashtra reimposes tobacco ban for one year after ’18 ban lapses

26,July, 2019 Comments off

Gutka, tobacco and pan masala have been banned for another year in Maharashtra, following the lapse of the prohibition imposed on it on July 21, 2018.
In this regard, the state Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has issued a letter reimposing the prohibition on the manufacture, storage, distribution, transport or sale of tobacco, which is either flavoured, scented or mixed with any of the said additives.
“FDA Maharashtra has been reimposing the bans for one-year period every year since 2012, as limited powers have been invested in this regard to the state food safety commissioner,” stated Milind Deshpande, assistant commissioner (food), FDA, Nagpur, Maharashtra.  
The ban is applicable to all forms of tobacco, whether going by the name or form of gutka, pan masala, flavoured/scented tobacco, manufactured chewing tobacco with additives, kharra, or otherwise by whatsoever name called, whether packaged or unpackaged and/or sold as one product, or though packaged as separate products, sold distributed in such a manner so as to easily facilitate mixing by the consumer, for its consumption.
It was recommended by Dr Pallavi Darade, food safety commissioner, Food And Drug Administration, Maharashtra in the interest of public health.
The food safety commissioner has a power, coupled with a duty under Section 30(2) (a) of the Food Safety and Standards Act, 2006 (FSSA, 2006) to prohibit in the interest of public health, the manufacture, storage, distribution or sale of any article of food. Chewing tobacco is listed as food at Item Number 40 in the table under Sub-regulation 2.3.1.
Constitution of India has considered the importance of human health, and therefore, Parliament passed the Food Safety and Standards Act, 2006, and considered the food safety commissioner accountable to prohibit in the interest of public health the 16 manufacture, storage, distribution or sale of any article of food, and duly authorised and duty bound under Section 30(2)(a) to make this order.
Therefore, tobacco, whether flavoured, scented or mixed with other ingredients such as nicotine, heavy metals, anti-caking agents quivam, menthol, keshar (except to the extent specifically permitted as ingredients), silver leaf, binders, flavours, scents, fragrances, prohibited chemicals, or any one of these ingredients (the said ingredients are hereafter collectively or individually, as the context requires, referred to as the said additives), such manufactured chewing tobacco with additives are food under Section 3(j) of the Food Safety and Standards Act, 2006.
As per the Food Safety and Standards (Prohibition and Restriction on Sales) Regulations 2011’s Regulation 2.3.4 food product not to contain any substance which may be injurious to health: Tobacco and nicotine shall not be used as ingredient in any food products. Chewing tobacco is listed as food at Item Number 40 in the table under Sub-regulation 2.3.1, i.e., Restriction on the use of insecticides under Regulation 2.3, i.e., Residue in Food Safety and Standards (Contamints, Toxins and Residues) Regulations, 2011.
After going through various scientific reports and opinions, it was noticed that gutka, pan masala, flavoured/scented tobacco, chewing tobacco, kharra and similar products containing tobacco by whatsoever name called, caused immense damage to the health of consumers and their adverse impact could also lead to alterations of the genetic make-up of future generations.
The definition of food is given at Section 3(j) of the Food Safety and Standards Act, 2006, therefore chewing tobacco is food. Many High Courts have considered chewing tobacco as food, e.g. Cr. Revision No. 318/1982, Manoharlal versus UP (Para Nos. 9 to 11); Bombay High Court in W.P. No. 1631/202; Dharival Industries Ltd versus State of Maharashtra (Para Nos. 21 to 23) and Supreme Court in R Krishna Murty versus Tamil Nadu 1980 (I) FAC: AIR 1980 SC,538.
Overwhelming scientific evidence shows that food products which have tobacco as their basic ingredient, whether or not containing the said additives, and whether going by the name of gutka, pan masala, flavoured/scented tobacco, chewing tobacco, jarda, khaini, kharra, or by any other name, have extremely deleterious effects on human health and well-being with consequential impact on society as well.
The addition of any one of several of the said additives particularly flavouring or scenting ingredients to tobacco significantly increases their allure, as raw unprocessed tobacco is less inviting in taste or texture.
Thus consumption of raw and unprocessed tobacco is usually large in quantities when flavoured, scented or containing one or the other of the said additives. It is the flavouring, scenting, adding or mixing of one or the other of the said additives or modification of the physical texture or combination of tobacco transforms these foods and makes them extremely inviting to a wide spectrum of population, including an increasing number of children.
Consumption of these products is increasing in large quantities and is becoming addictive, causing immense damage to the health of consumers and even involving an impact upon the genetic make-up of future generations.
Some of the said additives are themselves extremely dangerous to health and are prohibited under the Food Safety and Standards (Contaminants, Toxins and Residues) Regulations, 2011, the Food Safety and Standards (Food Products Standards and Food Additives) Regulations, 2011 and the Food Safety and Standards (Prohibition and Restrictions on Sales) Regulations, 2011.

Categories: NEWS

FSSAI issues gazette notification for creation of Central Advisory Committee

26,July, 2019 Comments off

FSSAI has issued a gazette notification for the creation of the new Central Advisory Committee (CAC). Its tenure shall be for a period of three years from July 2019. The chief executive officer of the country’s apex food regulator will be the ex-officio chairperson of the Committee.
The 48-member CAC, whose formation was prescribed by Sections 11 and 12 of the Food Safety and Standards Act, 2006, had representation from all the states and Union Territories (UTs), with their commissioners as members. The food industry, agriculture and consumer activists got two seats each. The other members of the committee represented esearch bodies and laboratories.
The food industry was represented by Prabodh Shirish Halde from AFST(I) and Meetu Kapur, Confederation of Indian Industries (CII).
"Vision document on Eat Right India was discussed along with other agendas at the meet," revealed Halde while speaking to FnB News.
"I personally look forward to contribute positively in making new India – Eat Right vision implementation since food safety is a shared responsibility," he said.
The agriculture sector was represented by R K Singh, representing ICAR – Central Institute of Post Harvest Engineering and Technology (CIPHET), Ludhiana, and Vilas Vishnu Shinde, chairman and managing director, Sahyadri Farmers Producer Co Ltd, Mohadi, Nashik, Maharashtra.
Ashim Sanyal, chief operating officer and secretary, Consumer Voice, and Ashhok Kapoor represented consumer organisations.
Research bodies were represented by Kaushik Banerjee, National Referral Laboratory, ICAR – National Research Centre for Grapes, Pune (Maharashtra), and Poonam Kakkar, chief scientist and head, herbal research section, CSIR-Indian Institute of Toxicology Research, Vishvigyan Bhawan Lucknow (Uttar Pradesh).
Sivalinga Prasad Vasireddi from Vimta Lab and Balwinder Singh Bajwa, director and chief executive officer, Edward Food Research and Analysis Centre Limited, represented laboratories.
The chairperson of the Scientific Committee included as an ex-officio member of the CAC.
The CAC forms a bridge between the various stakeholders of the food safety ecosystem, and it gives advice to the food authority on the performance of its duties, the prioritisation of work, the identification of potential risks, pooling of knowledge, etc. Led by the chairperson and chief executive officer of FSSAI, it will meet at regular intervals.

Categories: NEWS

FSSAI -Advisories / Orders- JULY 2019

26,July, 2019 Comments off
Categories: GO&NOTIFICATION

FSSAI–DRAFT NOTIFICATION–JULY 2019

26,July, 2019 Comments off

♦ Draft Food Safety and Standards (Prohibition and Restrictions on Sales) Amendment Regulations, 2019 relating to “Limit of Total Polar Compounds in Fresh/UnusedVegetable Oil/fat.  [Uploaded on : 16-07-2019]

♦ Draft Notification on Food Safety and Standards (Alcoholic Beverages) Amendment Regulations, 2019.  [Uploaded on : 15-07-2019]

♦ Draft Notification on Food Safety and Standards (Laboratory and sample Analysis) Amendment Regulations related to Approval of Rapid Analytical Food testing Kit, Equipment or Method  [Uploaded on : 15-07-2019]

♦ Draft notification on “Food Safety and Standards (Labelling and Display) Regulation, 2019”  [Uploaded on : 02-07-2019]

Categories: NEWS

FSSAI–GAZETTE NOTIFICATION–JULY 2019

26,July, 2019 Comments off

Gazette notification of Food Safety and Standards (Food Products Standards and Food Additives) Third Amendment Regulations, 2019 relating to new standards of chia oil and its fatty acid composition.  [Uploaded on : 16-07-2019]

♦ Final notification on Food Safety and Standards (Food Products Standards and Food Additives) Second Amendment Regulations, 2019 related to revision of existing standards of coconut milk and coconut cream, standards for dried oregano (whole and powder), pimento (Allspice) (whole and powder),formulation of laurel (Bay Leaf)(Whole and Powder), Dried Mint, Dried Rosemary notified vide F.No. Stds/F&VP/Notification (07)/FSSAI-2018 dated 05th July, 2019.  [Uploaded on : 15-07-2019]

♦ Gazette Notification with regard to constitution of Central Advisory Committee (CAC)  [Uploaded on : 12-07-2019]

♦ Draft notification on Food Safety and Standards (Prohibition and Restrictions on Sales) First Amendment Regulations, 2019 relating to “Restriction on the use of diacetyl as flavouring substance in oils and fats  [Uploaded on : 04-07-2019]

♦ Gazette Notification on Food Safety and Standards (Prohibition and Restrictions on Sales) Second Amendment Regulations, 2019 relating to revision in sub-regulation 2.3.12: Restriction on sale of common salt.  [Uploaded on : 04-07-2019]

Categories: GO&NOTIFICATION

Synthetic Milk plants Raided in Madhya Pradesh, 62 arrested.

21,July, 2019 Comments off
 

The Madhya Pradesh police arrested 62 people for allegedly manufacturing and supplying synthetic milk and other products and distributing them to branded milk outlets in six north Indian states, the PTI reported.

Three synthetic milk units located at Amba in Morena district and Lahar in the Bhind district of the Gwalior-Chambal region were raided by the Special Task Force (STF). They also raided a dozen other locations on Saturday but found the premises locked.

According to Rajesh Bhadoria, the STF Superintendent of Police, around 10,000 litres of spurious milk, over 500 kg of condensed milk and over 200 kg synthetic cottage cheese were seized during the raid. A huge quantity of liquid detergent, refined oil, maltodextrin powder, and other chemicals were also seized.

“As many as 20 tankers and 11 pick-up vans containing spurious milk and other products were seized,” the STF SP said.

30 percent milk was used in combination with refined oil, liquid detergent, white paint, and glucose powder in every liter of spurious milk produced at the three units, The NDTV report said, citing the officials.

How is Synthetic Milk produced?

Synthetic, milk is produced by adding white color water paint, oils, alkali, urea, and detergent, etc. Synthetic milk has a bitter after taste and turns yellowish on heating. The milk when rubbed between the fingers gives a soapy feeling.

The National Milk Quality Survey, 2018

The National Milk Quality Survey, 2018 was carried out by FSSAI to assess the quality of milk. The survey that was conducted in 602 towns collecting 6432 samples revealed that milk in India is largely safe. The Survey had found that 90% of the samples were safe and less than 10% of the samples were non-compliant.

Earlier this month, the Food Safety and Standards Authority of India (FSSAI) launched a scheme for Sampling, Testing & Inspection of milk to strengthen internal controls at the licensed dairy processing establishments. The Scheme that is tentatively planned to be operational by 1st October 2019 elaborates certain quality and safety tests that have to be done by the dairy establishments at regular intervals. This will help the establishments in identifying the cause of any non-compliance, take preventive and corrective action, the FSSAI had stated.

Categories: NEWS