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17,January, 2020 Leave a comment

Categories: NEWS

FSSAI invites bids for supply of 6,000 smart jackets via tender notice

4,January, 2020 Leave a comment

FSSAI, the country’s apex food regulator, has issued a tender notice inviting bids for supply of food safety smart jackets for the FSSAI. It intends to buy about 6,000 smart jackets, and has asked the companies to submit the tenders with relevant documents before or on January 30, 2020 by 1pm.
A pre-bid meeting will be held on January 16, 2020 at the office of FSSAI to clarify the issues and to answers the queries on any matter pertaining to the bid.
The notice stated that the selection will initially be for one year, and may be extended further by a year based on the satisfactory performance.
As reported earlier, FSSAI has been considering equipping the food safety officers with smart jackets. This will be mark of professional identity for all the FSOs (food safety officers) as a part of technology-driven innovative system of the food safety inspection in the country.
Pawan Kumar Agarwal, chief executive officer, FSSAI, has stated that this will enhance efficiency, professionalism and transparency in the food safety ecosystem, apart from bringing a sense of ownership and visibility of FSOs in the country.
The food safety smart jackets will have proviso for a RFID tag, camera and QR code to verify the identity of the FSO visiting the premise.
The tender notice stated that the smart jacket will help in containing cross-contamination during the inspection of food businesses and the design will be such that will assist in technology enabled inspections by allowing the FSO to smartly hold devices like tablets, smart phones, etc.
“It would also be a mark of professionalism and identity among the FSOs,” it added.

Categories: NEWS

FSSAI invites applications for capacity-building under FoSTaC programme

4,January, 2020 Leave a comment

 

FSSAI has invited applications for partnership for training and capacity building under the Food Safety Training and Certification (FoSTaC) programme. In a notification, the apex food regulator stated that it had decided to empanel reputed training partners, which can be academic institutions, corporate associations and big FBOs (food business operators), amongst others, for conducting training on behalf of FSSAI.
The notice stated, “Trade, professional and scientific associations in the food sector at the national, state or regional level with a membership of at least 100 members can be trainers. Food businesses with FSSAI licences and having annual turnover of Rs 150 crore can be training partners for training of FBOs in their upstream and downstream value chain. FBOs cannot provide training to their employees, however. Besides, academic and vocational institutes, including recognised universities, colleges, technical institutes, management institutes and other academic intuitions can be training partners.”
Under the FoSTaC, the trainers can be partners as food safety supervisors, and will give training on subjects, including street food vending, basic catering, basic manufacturing, basic storage and transport, basic retail and distribution, advance catering, advance manufacturing, advance storage and transport, advance retail and distribution, manufacturing special – oil, manufacturing special – bakery, manufacturing special – milk and milk products, manufacturing special – animal meat and meat products, manufacturing special – poultry meat and poultry products, manufacturing special – health supplements and nutraceuticals, manufacturing special – fish and seafood, and manufacturing special – water and water-based beverages.
Besides, courses for start-up, organic food business and National Food Control System are also a part of the programme.
It is pertinent to mention here that in the past, food businesses have participated in large-scale training and capacity building programmes on ensuring food safety through the Food Safety Training and Certification (FoSTaC) initiative, under which over 1.7 lakh food safety supervisors have been trained and certified in the country.

Categories: NEWS

FSSAI gives nod to 30 rapid food testing kits across six categories

4,January, 2020 Leave a comment

 

FSSAI has announced the introduction of new rapid food testing devices/kits for detection of food-borne pathogens and toxins. It has approved 30 rapid food testing kits/devices across six product categories, i.e., edible oils, milk, water and alcoholic beverages, meat and meat products, fish and fish products and raw and finished products, and an automated system for rapid detection of pathogens in food matrices.
The country’s apex food regulator, in a statement, said that these devices will ensure faster, better and cheaper real-time testing of food. These are expected to become an integral part of quality assurance/quality control programmes in the food industry, and also for regulatory and surveillance purposes in 2020.
It is pertinent to mention here that FSSAI recently issued a tender notice to purchase smart food safety jackets. One of the objectives of such jackets was to have provisions for keeping such rapid testing kits for faster results.
Meanwhile, in 2019, FSSAI had finalised the regulations for approval of rapid testing devices, kits and methods to strengthen the food testing ecosystem in the country.
FSSAI is also providing these kits/devices to the state governments for use by field officers and get quicker and validated results for tests conducted on different food products, such as milk and edible oils, amongst others.
Only two out of 30 rapid kits/ devices, however were indigenously manufactured, rest are all imported, despite the fact that many research and scientific institutions are engaged in development of such kits and devices.
Pawan Kumar Agarwal, chief executive officer, FSSAI, informed that steps have been initiated to make these devices available on government eProcurement marketplace (GeM) portal so that further procurements can be made by governments and local bodies on their own. FSSAI has invested over Rs 5 crore on this project so far.
“FSSAI would spend over Rs 20 crore and procure rapid food testing kits and devices. These would be provided to field officers through the state governments. We hoped that various states would also buy such kits/devices from the GeM portal to make them widely available with the enforcement officials,” he added.
“Once, such kits and devices are widely used for regulatory purposes; food industry would also begin to use them for internal quality assurance and quality control purposes,” Agarwal said, adding that there was a market potential of Rs 1,000 crore for such kits/devices in India alone.
He hoped that wider use of rapid food testing kits and devices for food testing would be a game-changer for India in 2020, and build greater public confidence in food available in the marketplace.
Also, the regulator has initiated steps so that indigenously developed kits/devices are validated and approved under its regulations on a fast-track basis.
It informed that work has begun on 30 of these kits/devices which will be for six product categories including fish and fish products, edible oils, salt, meat and chicken products, milk and milk adulteration, and cereals, pulses, fruits, vegetables and beverages.

Categories: NEWS

Rapid food testing devices and kits to redefine food safety in 2020

4,January, 2020 Leave a comment
 
 
 
FSSAI has made a quick progress towards the use of advanced technologies for food testing in the year 2019. Several new rapid food testing devices/kits for detection of food-borne pathogens and toxins were introduced in 2019. These devices ensure faster, better and cheaper real-time testing of food. These are expected to become an integral part of quality assurance/quality control programmes in the food industry, and also for regulatory and surveillance purposes in 2020.

In 2019, the country’s apex regulator had finalised the regulations for approval of rapid testing devices, kits and methods to strengthen the food testing ecosystem in the country. It has so far approved 30 rapid food testing kits/devices under these regulations, given as per List 1 attached below.

FSSAI is also providing these kits/devices to the state governments for use by field officers and get quicker and validated results for tests conducted on different food products, such as milk and edible oils, amongst others. Steps have been initiated to make these available on the government eProcurement marketplace (GeM) portal so that further procurements can be made by governments and local bodies on their own. FSSAI has invested over Rs 5 crore on this so far.

Only two out of 30 rapid kits/devices are indigenously manufactured, the rest are imported despite the fact that many research and scientific institutions are engaged in the development of such kits and devices.

FSSAI has initiated steps so that indigenously developed kits/devices are validated and approved under its regulations on a fast track basis.

Work has begun on 30 of these kits/devices as per List 2 attached below. These were on display at the second Eat Right Mela, organised in New Delhi recently.

Pawan Kumar Agarwal, chief executive officer, FSSAI, informed that the regulator would spend over Rs 20 crore and procure rapid food testing kits and devices. These would be provided to field officers through the state governments.

He hoped that various states would also buy such kits/devices from the GeM portal to make them widely available with the enforcement officials. Once, such kits and devices are widely used for regulatory purposes, the food industry would also begin to use them for internal quality assurance and quality control purposes.

Agarwal pointed that there is a market potential of Rs 1,000 crore for such kits/devices in India alone. He hoped that the wider use of rapid food testing kits and devices for food testing would be a game-changer for India in 2020, and build greater public confidence in food available in the marketplace.

List 1: Approved rapid kits/devices
 

Serial Number

Test kit name

Manufacturer

Matrices

1

Raman –1: Edible oils and fats

Oak Analytics India Pvt Ltd

Edible oils

2

 

3

4

5

6

 

7

Extenso kit 075/kit 275: Veterinary drug and antibiotics

Bioeasy (M1): Aflatoxin

Coliform count plates: Total coliform Aerobic count plates: Aerobic count Petrifilm Staph Express Count Plate + Disks): Staphylococcus aureus

Petrifilm EC plate: Enterobacteriaceae count

Unisensor, Belgium Indifoss Analytical Pvt Ltd 3M India Ltd, Bengaluru

Milk

8

9

10

Colilert and Colilert-18: Total coliform Pseudalert: Pseudomonas aeruginosa

Alcolyzer ME: Alcoholic beverages

IDEXX Lab Pvt Ltd

Anton Paar India Pvt Ltd

Water and alcoholic

beverages

11

12

13

 

14

 

15

Compact Dry (Coliforms): Coliforms Salmonella Velox: Salmonella

Petrifilm aerobic count plates: Aerobic count

E coli/coliform count plate: E coli/coliform count

Petrifilm Staph Express Count Plate +

Disks: Staphylococcus aureus

Nissui Pharma, Japan DNA Diagnostic, Denmark 3M India Ltd, Bengaluru

Meat and meat products; fish and fish products

16

17

 

18

19

20

21

22

 

23

Reveal 2.0: E coli

Petrifilm Staph Express Count Plate + Disks: Yeast and mold

PetrifilmY&M count : Yeast and mold Compact sry (E coli): E coli compact Dry (TPC): Total plate count compact Dry (BC): Bacillus cereus compact Dry (SA): Staphylococcus aureus

Compact Dry (Y&M): Yeast and

mold

Neogen (India) Pvt. Ltd 3M India Ltd, Bengaluru

 

 

Nissui Pharma, Japan

Raw and finished food

24

25

26

27

28

29

Vitek 2 compact: Pathogens Vidas (Tempo): Pathogens

Analytical profile index: Pathogens GeneUP: Virus and pathogens

Vidas: Pathogens

Reveal Q+Max: Pathogens

Biomerieux S A, France

 

 

 

 

Neogen (India) Pvt Ltd

Automated system for rapid detection of pathogens in food

matrices

 
List 2: Indigenously-developed rapid kits/devices
 

Serial number

Test kit name

Name of the developer/institute

Matrices

1

2

 

3

4

5

Formaldehyde detection kit

Ammonia detection kit

17 a MT ELISA Kit : Hormones 17 a, 20 ß DIOHP ELISA kit

11-KT ELISA kit: Hormones

ICAR-CIFT,

Kochi (commercialised by HiMedia Laboratories)

NIHFW, New Delhi

Fish and fish products

6

7

Argemone oil detection kit

Mustard oil check

CSIR-IITR, Lucknow

Edible oils

8

9

10

Iron fortified salt iodised salt

Salt iodine rapid test

NIN Hyderabad HLL Lifecare Ltd (Commercialised by-HLL

Lifecare Ltd)

Iron fortified salt

Salts

Iodised salt

11

12

 

13

 

14

 

15

16

17

Food animal species identification Carotenoid-based assay to ascertain the cattle origin of tissues

Natural dye-based time temperature indicators

Natural dye-based quality evaluation of frozen/chilled mutton and chicken

ELISA kit for Dexamethosone ELISA kit for MPA

ELISA kit for Prednisolone

ICAR-IVRI, Izatnagar

 

 

 

 

DFRL, Mysuru NIHFW, New Delhi

Meat and meat products

 

 

 

 

Frozen/chilled mutton and chicken

Meat and meat products

18

 

 

19

20

 

21

 

 

22

 

23

24

25

26

27

Kit for detection of adulteration in milk – small, medium, large

 

KEMAT – Milk goMATA – Milk

 

Kit for detection of adulteration in milk

Spore-based kit for detection of antibiotic residues

Milk test (Strip-based) Antibiotics milk test (Strip-based)

Pesticide Milk Progesterone ELISA/LFIA

L-lactate sensing using nanomaterials

Strip assay to check adulteration

NDDB, Anand (Commercialised by Jupiter Glass Works) Dayalbagh Educational Institute, Agra

NDRI,

Karnal (Commercialised by Delmos Research Pvt Ltd)

NDRI, Karnal (Commercialised by Florecer Services Ltd)

 

 

NIHFW, New Delhi NIFTEM, Kundli

 

CSIR-IITR, Lucknow

Milk adulteration (detergent, neutralisers, urea, hydrogen peroxide, glucose, maltodextrin, sucrose)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Milk

Milk, baby milk

 

Milk

28

29

 

30

Total aflatoxins (B1, B2, G1 and G2)

Rapid testing Kit for differentiation of pathogens

Biokit for detection of organophosphate

and organocarbamate pesticides

NIFTEM, Kundli

IIT, Gandhinagar

 

BARC, Mumbai

Cereal, pulses, fruits, vegetables and bseverages

 
Categories: NEWS

FSSAI extends implementation of labelling provisions for frozen desserts

4,January, 2020 Leave a comment

FSSAI has extended the implementation of the labelling provisions for the products covered under the frozen dessert or confection category. The decision was taken by the apex food regulator, as the matter related to the nomenclature of frozen dessert was under review.
The regulator’s order stated that representations have been received from a section of stakeholders requesting for further extension of time for compliance of Food Safety and Standards (Food Product Standards and Food Additives) 13th Amendment Regulations of 2017 related to frozen dessert, as the issue of nomenclature was still under review in FSSAI.
And there would be a stay on the these regulations until a final outcome was reached through review.
“After due consideration of the fact that the issue of nomenclature of frozen dessert is still under review in FSSAI, it has been decided to further extend the timeline for compliance of the labelling requirement for frozen desserts or confections with added vegetable oil/fat and/or vegetable protein as per Clause 6(c) of Sub-regulation 2.1.15 of the amended regulation till the final decision of FSSAI on the nomenclature of frozen dessert,” the order read.
The order added that however the food business operators are required to comply with all other standards/labelling provisions specified for the said products under these regulations.
It is pertinent to mention here that the ice cream manufacturers have raised objections on the nomenclature frozen dessert and have sent a petition to FSSAI for a review. The regulator has decided to constitute an expert group to further review of the subject.
Meanwhile, the timeline for compliance of these regulations was given till January 1, 2019. It got extended to July 1, 2019, and the current deadline ended on January 1, 2020.

Categories: NEWS

குஜராத்தில் அமைப்புசாரா பால் விநியோகஸ்தர்கள் ஒரு ஒழுங்குமுறை வரம்பின் கீழ் கொண்டுவரப்படுவார்கள்: எஃப்.எஸ்.எஸ்.ஏ.ஐ

4,January, 2020 Leave a comment

குஜராத்தில் உள்ள அமைப்புசாரா பால் விநியோகஸ்தர்கள், விற்பனையாளர்கள் மற்றும் உற்பத்தியாளர்கள், இந்தியாவின் உணவு பாதுகாப்பு மற்றும் தர ஆணையம் தொடங்குவுள்ள புதிய ‘சரிபார்க்கப்பட்ட பால் விற்பனையாளர்கள்‘ திட்டத்தைத் தொடங்குவதன் மூலம் ஒரு ஒழுங்குமுறை வரம்பின் கீழ் வருவார்கள் எனக் கூறப்படுகிறது.

இதுபோன்ற அமைப்புசாரா பால் உற்பத்தியாளர்கள் மற்றும் விற்பனையாளர்கள் அனைவருக்கும் புதிய திட்டத்தின் கீழ் பதிவு குறித்த அடையாள அட்டைகள் வழங்கப்படும் என்று தி இந்து பிசினஸ்லைன் தெரிவித்துள்ளது.

மாநிலத்தில் 40 லட்சம் பால் உற்பத்தியாளர்கள் மற்றும் விற்பனையாளர்கள் உள்ளனர்.  குஜராத்தில் பெறப்படும் அனுபவத்தின் அடிப்படையில் இதேபோன்ற திட்டத்தை நாடு தழுவிய அளவில் அறிமுகம் செய்யப்படும்.

தற்போது, ​​கூட்டுறவு பால்பண்ணைகள் மற்றும் பதிவுசெய்யப்பட்ட தனியார் பால்பண்ணைகள் மட்டுமே உணவுப் பாதுகாப்பு மற்றும் தரநிலைகள் சட்டத்தின் படி ஒழுங்குமுறை கட்டமைப்பின் கீழ் வருகின்றன. இருப்பினும், சிறிய விற்பனையாளர்கள் மற்றும் தயாரிப்பாளர்கள் இத்தகைய விதிமுறைகளின் எல்லைக்கு வெளியே தொடர்ந்து செயல்படுகிறார்கள்.

குஜராத்தின் உணவு மற்றும் மருந்து கட்டுப்பாட்டு நிர்வாகத்தின் (எஃப்.டி.சி.ஏ) கமிஷனர் ஹேமந்த் ஜி கோஷியா இந்த திட்டத்தை வெளியிடுவதற்கான பணிகள் இன்னும் நடைபெற்று வருவதாகவும், அனைத்து விற்பனையாளர்களுக்கும் அடுத்த ஆறு மாதங்கள் முதல் ஒரு வருடம் வரை அடையாள அட்டைகள் வழங்கப்படும் என்றும் அவர்கள் எதிர்பார்க்கிறார்கள் .

Categories: NEWS

New sensor to test milk

4,January, 2020 Leave a comment
 

Researchers at the Indian Institute of Technology Guwahati (IITG) have developed a simple paper-based sensor to assess the freshness of milk, and the method is instantaneous. Commonly used tests to study the effectiveness of pasteurisation such as the Methylene Blue Dye Reduction Test are time-consuming. It can take hours for the colour changes that indicate the presence or absence of microbes to occur. Commercial phenol-based tests require sophisticated spectrophotometers and involve multi-step procedures.

A research team led by Pranjal Chandra of the Department of Biosciences and Bioengineering at IITG developed a simple visual detection technique to detect the quality of milk without the need for special equipment or instruments. Their work was recently published in the journal “Biosensors and Bioelectronics”.

Alkaline phosphatase (ALP), an enzyme present in raw milk, is destroyed at high pasteurisation temperature and is therefore an important biomarker in the quality control of milk. Detection of ALP in milk can thus point to inadequate pasteurisation and/or contamination with raw milk. According to Pranjal Chandra, despite ALP’s recognisable detection potential in native milk, the multi-step nature of and the requirement of sophisticated bulky analytical instruments and trained personnel to detect ALP with the currently used methods limit their use as a sensor of milk quality in remote settings and in home kitchens. Such testing, he pointed out, would require easy-to-operate portable detection kits.

The researchers took simple filter paper, chemically modified it and loaded it with the anti-ALP compound 5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl phosphate, which captures the ALP present in the milk by forming a blue-green precipitate. The intensity of the colour indicates the amount of ALP present. In the absence of ALP, there will be no colouration. The team used a smartphone to capture the image of the colour and used the RGB (Red Green Blue) filter in the phone to profile the colour obtained, which could be correlated to the ALP concentration in the test sample.

“Our sensor takes merely 13 minutes to detect ALP, and hence it can be applied for quick onsite analysis,” Pranjal Chandra said. The researchers successfully tested milk obtained from villages and commercially available milk samples using their kit and found that they could detect down to 0.87 units of ALP per millilitre of milk to 91-100 per cent accuracy. This detection limit and accuracy make it possible to discriminate raw milk from pasteurised/boiled milk. The team has developed a miniaturised detection kit. Kuldeep Mahato, Ashutosh Kumar and Buddhadev Purohit of the research team have also developed an advanced version of the paper-based sensor with improved accuracy using a label-free bioelectronic chip. The researchers plan to commercialise both variants of the kit.

Categories: NEWS

New sensor to test milk

4,January, 2020 Leave a comment
 

Researchers at the Indian Institute of Technology Guwahati (IITG) have developed a simple paper-based sensor to assess the freshness of milk, and the method is instantaneous. Commonly used tests to study the effectiveness of pasteurisation such as the Methylene Blue Dye Reduction Test are time-consuming. It can take hours for the colour changes that indicate the presence or absence of microbes to occur. Commercial phenol-based tests require sophisticated spectrophotometers and involve multi-step procedures.

A research team led by Pranjal Chandra of the Department of Biosciences and Bioengineering at IITG developed a simple visual detection technique to detect the quality of milk without the need for special equipment or instruments. Their work was recently published in the journal “Biosensors and Bioelectronics”.

Alkaline phosphatase (ALP), an enzyme present in raw milk, is destroyed at high pasteurisation temperature and is therefore an important biomarker in the quality control of milk. Detection of ALP in milk can thus point to inadequate pasteurisation and/or contamination with raw milk. According to Pranjal Chandra, despite ALP’s recognisable detection potential in native milk, the multi-step nature of and the requirement of sophisticated bulky analytical instruments and trained personnel to detect ALP with the currently used methods limit their use as a sensor of milk quality in remote settings and in home kitchens. Such testing, he pointed out, would require easy-to-operate portable detection kits.

The researchers took simple filter paper, chemically modified it and loaded it with the anti-ALP compound 5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl phosphate, which captures the ALP present in the milk by forming a blue-green precipitate. The intensity of the colour indicates the amount of ALP present. In the absence of ALP, there will be no colouration. The team used a smartphone to capture the image of the colour and used the RGB (Red Green Blue) filter in the phone to profile the colour obtained, which could be correlated to the ALP concentration in the test sample.

“Our sensor takes merely 13 minutes to detect ALP, and hence it can be applied for quick onsite analysis,” Pranjal Chandra said. The researchers successfully tested milk obtained from villages and commercially available milk samples using their kit and found that they could detect down to 0.87 units of ALP per millilitre of milk to 91-100 per cent accuracy. This detection limit and accuracy make it possible to discriminate raw milk from pasteurised/boiled milk. The team has developed a miniaturised detection kit. Kuldeep Mahato, Ashutosh Kumar and Buddhadev Purohit of the research team have also developed an advanced version of the paper-based sensor with improved accuracy using a label-free bioelectronic chip. The researchers plan to commercialise both variants of the kit.

Categories: NEWS