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26,March, 2020 Leave a comment

Categories: NEWS

FSSAI to look into instances of sale & supply of adulterated foodstuff

9,March, 2020 Leave a comment
 
 
 
Instances of sale and supply of sub-standard and adulterated foodstuff, including edible oil, have come to the notice of Food Safety and Standards Authority of India (FSSAI).

To prevent food adulteration regular surveillance, monitoring, inspection and random sampling of food products, including edible oil, are being carried out by food safety officers of states and UTs (Union Territories), and action has been initiated against as per the provisions of the Food Safety and Standards, Act, 2006 against the defaulting food business operators (FBOs).

In order to ensure the availability of good-quality foodstuff to the consumers and for keeping a check on problem of food adulteration, the state food safety authorities have been advised from time to time to keep a strict vigil by regularly drawing food samples from all sources, viz, manufacturers, wholesalers and retailers and to take strict action against the offenders under the provisions of the FSS Act, 2006.

To check sale of adulterated edible oil, FSSAI has notified regulations, which provide for sale of edible oils in the packaged form only, except for the sale of loose oil in specific circumstances as permitted by the State Government.

It has strengthened the food testing ecosystem by notifying 263 primary food testing labs across the country, and state food testing labs under a Central Sector Scheme, viz, Strengthening of Food Testing System in the Country, including provision of Mobile Food Testing Labs (SoFTeL).

The country’s apex food regluator has released a booklet called Detect Adulteration with Rapid Test (DART), which covers over 50 common quick tests for detection of food adulterants at household by the citizens themselves, so as to induce awareness among the consumers about food safety. DART book is available on FSSAI’s website.

It has also introduced a policy for the adoption of Rapid Analytical Food Testing (RAFT) kit/equipment/methods for regulatory purposes.

Enforcement of the provisions of the FSS Act, 2006, Rules and Regulations made thereunder primarily rests with the states and UTs. As per the reports received from the states and UTs, the details of action taken against offenders during the last three years are given below:

Statement of number of prosecutions launched and action taken during the last three years

Year

Number of civil /

criminal cases launched

Convictions

Number of cases in
which
penalties imposed

Amount raised

2016-17

13,080

1,605

4,757

Rs 17,01,93,266

2017-18

 15,121

5,198

7,627

Rs 26,35,41,067

2018-19

 21,363

701

12,734

Rs 32,57,78,087

 
This was stated by Ashwini Kumar Choubey, minister of state for health and family welfare, in a written reply in the Rajya Sabha on Tuesday.

Categories: NEWS

Imported food, including Corona-hit nations’ imports, safe, says FSSAI

9,March, 2020 Leave a comment

The Food Safety and Standards Authority of India (FSSAI), the country’s apex food regulator, has informed that food imported into India, including those from the Coronavirus-affected countries, is safe for human consumption.
To address concerns raised regarding the safety of such foods, FSSAI had constituted a committee of experts to examine possibilities of the presence of COVID-19 in imported food items.
In its report, the regulator opined that as of now, there was no conclusive evidence for the food-borne transmission of the Coronavirus, which predominately affects the respiratory system and spreads from human to human via droplets while sneezing, coughing, contaminated hands and surfaces.
The committee agreed with the advisories of global organisations that the predominant routes of transmission of the Coronavirus appeared to be human to human. It also clarified that meat from cooked livestock, including poultry, was safe to eat.
As a precautionary measure, the committee advised to avoid consumption of raw or
undercooked meat, as well as unprocessed food products. Frozen food items must be
consumed  only  after  cooking  them  properly. Good hygienic practices must be followed before consuming raw fruits and vegetables.
FSSAI is keeping a close watch on the situation. It will continue to gather and monitor  evidences from international agencies and scientific communities of any such transmission, leading to the Coronavirus disease, and will take appropriate steps to ensure the safety of food products. 

Categories: NEWS

பார்மலின் கலந்து விற்பனை

9,March, 2020 Leave a comment

Categories: NEWS

Stale fish destroyed during raids at Pollachi

9,March, 2020 Leave a comment
 

Officials of Food Safety and Standards Authority of India (FSSAI) on Sunday inspected fish stalls at Pollachi in Coimbatore district to check the use of preservatives like formalin in fish and also sale of stale fish.

They seized 20 kg of stale fish from four fish stalls that were later destroyed.

K. Tamilselvan, Designated Officer of FSSAI in Coimbatore, said that the raids were held as part of instructions from the Commissioner of Food Safety and Coimbatore District Collector.

He said that one fish stall was found using banned plastic carry bag for packing. Officials slapped a fine of ₹2,000 on the stall owner.

Dr. Tamilselvan added that stern action will be taken against stalls if they were found selling fish laced with preservatives and stale fish. On March 5, FSSAI and Fisheries Department had seized 430 kg of stale fish and 70 kg of fish found with traces of formalin from the wholesale and retail fish markets at Ukkadam in Coimbatore.

Categories: NEWS

Fat-free approach: FSSAI is trying to make India vanaspati free

9,March, 2020 Leave a comment
 

The World Health Organisation (WHO) and the Foods Standards and Safety Authority of India (FSSAI) are working in tandem to eliminate the presence of TFA from industrially produced cooking oils.

FSSAI plans to cap TFA at 3% by 2021 and 2% by 2022 in edible fats and oils.

All of us want to lead a healthy life, but there are hurdles in achieving this goal. Inability to avoid cooking oils containing trans-fats or trans fatty acids (TFA) and lack of awareness about our eating habits, are the two prime problems.

It has been scientifically proven, that the use of TFA is fraught with major health issues. Despite this, consumption of oils is high. Besides, cut-throat competition has resulted in large-scale production of vegetable oils using the hydrogenation process, which jacks up the content of TFA. Oil-makers resort to this process as it is cost effective and increases shelf life.

The World Health Organisation (WHO) and the Foods Standards and Safety Authority of India (FSSAI) are working in tandem to eliminate the presence of TFA from industrially produced cooking oils. But the progress towards the elimination of trans fats (which means restricting their presence to 0.2%) has been slow.

To begin with, FSSAI put in place a regulation in 2016 halving the permissible quantum of trans-fats in edible fats and oils from 10% to 5%. On its part, WHO launched a REPLACE campaign in 2018 for global-level elimination of trans-fats in industrially produced edible oils by 2023. The Indian regulator has got more ambitious, setting 2022 as the deadline.

FSSAI plans to cap TFA at 3% by 2021 and 2% by 2022 in edible fats and oils. The resolution is yet to become a regulation.

According to a WHO report, Indian snacks contain 6-30% of TFA, far exceeding the safe limit of 2%. One survey of street food in Delhi and Haryana found that 25% of snacks contained high TFA levels. Snacks such as samosa, gulab jamun and jalebi prepared in vanaspati-a primary dietary source for trans fats prepared by adding hydrogen to the cheap edible oils-reportedly contained 50% of fat in the form of TFA.

Consumption of trans fats beyond the prescribed limit disrupts good and bad cholesterol (HDL and LDL) levels, causing dyslipidemia, heart diseases, diabetes, liver dysfunction, fertility issues, Alzheimer’s disease, depression and some types of cancer. This is also the reason that India has witnessed an escalation in DALYs attributable to NCDs.

Considering all these aspects, FSSAI launched an awareness campaign “Heart attack rewind.” Through another initiative, the authority launched a “Trans Fat Free” logo for voluntary labelling to promote TFA-free products. The label can be used by bakeries, local food outlets and shops for preparations containing TFA not exceeding 0.2 per 100 g/ml. Offering subsidies on edible oils with healthier nutrient profiles could be another approach. Authorities should not promote consumption of saturated fats as part of the trans fat free movement. These are also associated with health hazards.

The need to achieve the goal before the 2022 deadline cannot be over-emphasised, considering the high stakes.

Categories: NEWS

Food dept team attacked by bakery owner

9,March, 2020 Leave a comment
 

Jhansi: A team of officials of the food department which had gone to collect samples of eatables from a bakery in the city on Sunday afternoon were allegedly attacked by the bakery owner and his employees. The bakery was later sealed and the officials are in process of lodging a case in this connection.

According to reports, a team of officials of the food safety department had gone to collect samples from a bakery but the the owner resisted.

Following heated arguments between the officials and the bakery owner, the latter along with his workers, allegedly attacked one of the officials. The team immediately informed the police following which city magistrate Salil Kumar Patel and CO (city), Sangram Singh arrived with the force. After hearing both the sides, the police took the CCTV footage for the purpose of investigation.

The city magistrate said, “The officials of the food department have sealed the bakery and are in the process of lodging an FIR”.

Categories: NEWS

New Delhi to host seventh annual conference of AOAC’s India Section

3,March, 2020 Leave a comment

 

AOAC India will host the seventh annual conference of the India Section of AOAC international at The Park Hotel, New Delhi, on February 28 and 29, 2020. Building Capacity and Collaborative Leadership to Ensure Safe and Nutritious Food will be the theme of the meet, at which leading specialists, including prominent scientists, regulators, industry partners and scholars from around the world will congregate to discuss and debate on the various challenges with regard to food safety.
“Our chief mission is to become a facilitator in the development and harmonisation of validated analytical methods with the discussion,” stated the executive committee of AOAC India.
As was the case with the previous editions, this year’s conference will comprise keynote lectures, plenary presentations, a young scientist talk and poster sessions. Its objective willl be to create a platform for information exchange and knowledge transfer among the participants.
The eminent speakers at the conference will include Dr Balasubramanium; Dr Ranjan Mitra (presidential address); Dr Kaushik Banerjee (chairman’s address); Pawan Kumar Agarwal (former chief executive officer, FSSAI); Dr Palmer A Orlandi, Jr (deputy executive editor and chief scientist, AOAC); Dr Erick Konnings of Nestle Research, Lausanne, Switzerland (past president, AOAC International, and session chair, FIA Singapore), and chief scientists, AOAC International, Dr Bhaskar, advisor, FSSAI; Dr Anab Chandra, Dabur (TBD) and Dr Saurabh Arora of Arbro Pharmaceuticals, among many others.
The lectures are designed on present and emerging broad areas of research, such as food safety and security; food safety laws and regulations; analytical residue method development of pesticides; veterinary drugs and antibiotics; food nutrition and food allergens; botanicals and dietary supplements and microbiological methods, to name a few. Interactive sessions and workshops are also included on request.
The India Section of AOAC International will be releasing A Guide to Analytical Documentation in Food Testing Laboratories at the conference. Worldwide, food testing laboratories are being committed to building capacity for complying with various national and international regulatory guidelines in the process of their analytical method validation, deciding evaluation criteria of retesting, and for the implementation of decision rules to meet expectations of the industry stakeholders.
However, laboratory personnel often find it difficult to understand the philosophy of these regulatory requirements and implement an ideal quality system for necessary compliance.
This guidebook is intended to offer a comprehensive reference on the quality system documentation in a practical way while drawing on a range of case studies.
By strengthening the cord between governmental bodies and private sectors, this two-day conference will result in new recommendations about how to solve exceedingly complicated food safety problems and make our planet a safer place to live.

Categories: NEWS

Aim of AOAC India’s collaborative leadership meet to ensure food safety

3,March, 2020 Leave a comment

Our Bureau, New Delhi

AOAC India’s seventh annual conference, titled Building Capacity and Collaborative Leadership to ensure Safe and Nutritious Food, commenced at the Park Hotel in New Delhi on Friday.
As a prominent food safety conference, it brought together nearly 300 analytical professionals, including top government food safety regulators, eminent scientists, academicians, industry partners, laboratory owners, researchers and students.
The line-up of speakers for the inaugural session included Dr Ranjan Mitra, president, India section, AOAC International; Dr Kaushik Banerjee, chairman, AOAC India; Dr N Bhaskar, advisor, FSSAI; Dr Palmer A Orlandi, deputy executive director and chief science officer, AOAC; Dr Henk Vd Schee, advisor, Netherlands Food Safety Authority; Matthew Kovec, executive director, Food Industry, Asia, Singapore, and N Venkateshwaran, chief executive officer, NABL.
AOAC International released a book titled A Guide to Analytical Documentation in Food Testing Laboratories at the annual conference. It stated that worldwide, food testing laboratories were being committed to building capacity to comply with various national and international regulatory guidelines in the process of their analytical method validation, deciding evaluation criteria of retesting, and for the implementation of decision rules to meet the expectations of the industry stakeholders.
However, laboratory personnel often find it difficult to understand the philosophy of these regulatory requirements and implement an ideal quality system for necessary compliance.  This guidebook was intended to offer a comprehensive reference on the quality system documentation in a practical way, while drawing on a range of case studies.
Dr Ranjan Mitra, president, AOAC-India, commented, “We are delighted to host the 7th Annual Conference of India Chapter of AOAC International giving an opportunity to explore, network and discuss issues in the topics on analytical sciences the industry representatives were seen keenly interested in the discussion on topics like Challenges in Food Safety Regulatory Compliance; Environmental persistence of veterinary drug residues – a neglected cause of residues; Ensuring Food Safety through Harmonisation of Analytical Methodology, Analytical Quality Control Techniques in a Testing Lab and New Frontiers in Food Analytics.
The conference comprised keynote lectures, plenary presentations, poster sessions and interactive group discussions, creating a platform for information exchange and knowledge transfer.
The eminent speakers were from India, the USA, the UK and Europe, and covered various facets of food analysis, global food safety issues, quality control regulations, food authenticity and capacity building for the running of effective global food systems within the nation.
Over 50 leading organisations from six different countries participated to converse on how to solve complex analytical problems and develop compliant solutions to ensure human health.

Categories: NEWS