MADURAI OIL & OIL SEEDS ASSOCIATION–PRESS NEWS

23,June, 2017 Leave a comment

FSS ACTFSS ACT 2

Categories: NEWS

Advisory on Ban on milk and milk products from China. (Uploaded on: 22.06.2017)

23,June, 2017 Leave a comment

Advisory_Milk_Ban_China_22_06_2017

Categories: GO&NOTIFICATION

FSSAI-Notice for Claims, Suggestions and Comments

23,June, 2017 Leave a comment

Notice Calling for suggestions, views, comments etc from stakeholders on draft amendment purity of steviol glycosides.  (Uploaded on: 20.06.2017)

The objections or suggestions, if any, may be addressed as per the attached format to the Chief Executive Officer, Food Safety and Standards Authority of India, 03rd Floor, Food and Drug Administration Bhawan, Kotla road, New Delhi – 110002 or emailed to regulation@fssai.gov.in within 60 days from uploading of this notice on the website or up to 30 days from the draft notification of these standards, whichever is later.

————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————-

Notice Calling for suggestions, views, comments etc from stakeholders on draft amendment in Food Safety and Standards (Import) Regulations, 2017.  (Uploaded on: 20.06.2017)

The objections or suggestions, if any, may be addressed as per the attached format to the Chief Executive Officer, Food Safety and Standards Authority of India, 03rd Floor, Food and Drug Administration Bhawan, Kotla road, New Delhi – 110002 or emailed to regulation@fssai.gov.in within 60 days from uploading of this notice on the website or up to 30 days from the draft notification of these standards, whichever is later.

————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————-

Notice Calling for suggestions, views, comments etc from stakeholders within a period of 60 days on the draft notification related to Food Safety and Standards (Recovery and distribution of surplus foods) Regulations, 2017.  (Uploaded on: 20.06.2017)

The objections or suggestions, if any, may be addressed as per the attached format to the Chief Executive Officer, Food Safety and Standards Authority of India, 03rd Floor, Food and Drug Administration Bhawan, Kotla road, New Delhi – 110002 or emailed to regulation@fssai.gov.in within 60 days from uploading of this notice on the website or up to 30 days from the draft notification of these standards, whichever is later.

————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————-

Notice Calling for suggestions, views, comments etc from stakeholders within a period of 60 days on the draft notification related to standards of  all pulses, whole and decorticated Pearl Millet grains, Degermed Maize flour and Maize Grit, Couscous, Tempe, Textured Soy Protein, Sago flour. (Uploaded on: 20.06.2017)

The objections or suggestions, if any, may be addressed as per the attached format to the Chief Executive Officer, Food Safety and Standards Authority of India, 03rd Floor, Food and Drug Administration Bhawan, Kotla road, New Delhi – 110002 or emailed to regulation@fssai.gov.in within 60 days from uploading of this notice on the website or up to 30 days from the draft notification of these standards, whichever is later.

————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————-

Notice Calling for suggestions, views, comments etc from stakeholders within a period of 60 days on the draft notification related to tolerance limit of antibiotics and pharmacology active substances. (Uploaded on: 12.06.2017)

The objections or suggestions, if any, may be addressed as per the attached format to the Chief Executive Officer, Food Safety and Standards Authority of India, 03rd Floor, Food and Drug Administration Bhawan, Kotla road, New Delhi – 110002 or emailed to regulation@fssai.gov.in within 60 days from uploading of this notice on the website or up to 30 days from the draft notification of these standards, whichever is later.

————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————-

Categories: NEWS

FSSAI–DRAFTS

23,June, 2017 Leave a comment

Draft Food Safety and Standards (Food Products Standards and Food Additives) Amendment Regulation 2017 regarding inclusion of fatty acid composition for various edible vegetables oils. (Uploaded on: 22.06.2017)

The objections or suggestions, if any, may be addressed to the Chief Executive Officer, 03rd Floor, Food Safety and Standards Authority of India,Food and Drug Administration Bhawan, Kotla Road, New Delhi. 110002. The objections or suggestions may also be mailed to regulation@fssai.gov.in on or before 22.07.2017.

————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————-

Draft Food Safety and Standards (Organic Foods) Regulation, 2017. (Uploaded on: 22.06.2017)

The objections or suggestions, if any, may be addressed to the Chief Executive Officer, 03rd Floor, Food Safety and Standards Authority of India,Food and Drug Administration Bhawan, Kotla Road, New Delhi. 110002. The objections or suggestions may also be mailed to regulation@fssai.gov.in on or before 22.07.2017.

————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————-

Draft Food Safety and Standards (Food Products Standards and Food Additives) Amendment Regulation 2017 related to omission of labelling requirements for Beverages Non-Alcoholic Carbonated. (Uploaded on: 06.06.2017)

The objections or suggestions, if any, may be addressed to the Chief Executive Officer, 03rd Floor, Food Safety and Standards Authority of India,Food and Drug Administration Bhawan, Kotla Road, New Delhi. 110002. The objections or suggestions may also be mailed to regulation@fssai.gov.in on or before 06.07.2017.

————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————-

Categories: DRAFT

BAN ON IMPORT OF CHINESE MILK PRODUCTS EXTENDED BY A YR

23,June, 2017 Leave a comment
 

The Government on Thursday extended the ban on import of milk and its products from China for one more year till June 2018. India had first imposed the ban in September 2008 when it was feared that some milk consignments from the country contained melamine, a toxic chemical used for making plastics and fertilisers.

"Prohibition on import of milk and milk products (including chocolates and chocolate products and candies/ confectionery/ food preparations with milk or milk solids as an ingredient) from China is extended for one more year, i.e., till 23.6.2018 or until their safety is established or their credential is established on the basis of the credible reports," said a senior officer from the Food Safety and Standards Authority of India (FSSAI).

The ban, which expired on June 23, is extended every year.

India does not import milk products from China, but has imposed the ban as a preventive measure. Milk contaminated with melamine, a chemical which causes kidney stones in young children had led to several deaths in China in 2008,

India is the world’s largest producer and consumer of milk. Among states, Uttar Pradesh is the leading milk producer, followed by Rajasthan and Gujarat.

Categories: NEWS

Food safety authority’s draft amendments include fatty acids composition in edible oil

23,June, 2017 Leave a comment
 

NEW DELHI, JUNE 22:

In a bid to curb misleading claims and adulteration in edible oils, the Food Safety and Standards Authority (FSSAI) has notified a draft regulation that sets standards for the permissible composition of fatty acids in various types of edible oils.

The amendments in the regulation have been introduced at a time when edible oil companies have been increasingly looking at launching blended oil products to woo consumers with various health benefit claims.

The food regulator said the draft FSS (Food Product Standards and Food Additives) Amendment Regulation 2017 will pave the way for determination of the authenticity of edible oils by incorporating fatty acid composition in the standards. “Since the fatty acid composition is different for each edible oil, this amendment will go a long way in exposing and curbing two malpractices in the edible oil sector- adulteration of expensive oils with cheaper oils and misleading label claims on the composition of blended oils,” the regulator said in its notification. It is seeking comments from various stakeholders.

Ashwin Bhadri, CEO, Equinox Labs, said the new draft speaks about the percentage of fatty acids composition along with the different kinds of fatty acids founds in 20 types of edible oils besides their permissible limits. “This regulation will provide clarity to edible oil makers and testing authorities. It will also benefit consumers by bringing in transparency regarding the oil composition that they consume and ensure their safety,” he added.Organic food

Meanwhile, FSSAI also released a draft notification on organic food that aims to bring in a regulatory framework to ensure safety of such products as well their authentic organic status.

According to the draft FSS (Organic Foods) Regulations, any food offered for sale as “organic food’’ should comply with the provisions laid down under either the National Programme for Organic Production or the Participatory Guarantee System for India or any other systems notified by the FSSAI.

The draft regulation also mandates that such foods should convey accurate information on the organic status of the product and should carry a certificate or quality assurance mark, among other things.

Categories: NEWS

FSSAI’s move regarding organic food’s certification not wise: CSE

23,June, 2017 Leave a comment
 

Making organic certification mandatory will only promote the certification industry but not safe food

Quick Read

FSSAI wants to make certification for foods sold as ‘organic’ in India mandatory

However, FSSAI’s move might result in more Indian farmers giving up organic farming

This could impact food safety in India

Delhi-based non-profit, Centre for Science and Environment (CSE) has disapproved of the Food Safety and Standards Authority of India (FSSAI)’s move to make certification of organic food sold in India mandatory. It says that not only will such a move promote just the certification industry but also strike a blow to the organic farming movement in India and impact country’s food safety.

On March 31, 2017, the Food Safety and Standards Authority of India (FSSAI) had issued a notice asking for comments on a proposed regulation titled “Draft Food Safety and Standards (Organic Foods) Regulations, 2017” (Draft Regulations). The regulation seeks to make certification mandatory for any food that claims to be “organic” in the domestic market.

Currently, certification for food sold as “organic” in India is not mandatory. However, there are two prevalent certification systems which are voluntarily followed by those who want to sell food under this category. The first system, which is governed by the Union Ministry of Commerce and Industry, is mandatory for exports. It is called the National Programme for Organic Production and is also referred to as “Third Party Certification”. The second system, governed by the Union Ministry of Agriculture and Farmers’ Welfare, is called the Participatory Guarantee System (PGS) and is meant only for the domestic market. The Third Party Certification system is applicable to individual farmers or farmer groups, while the PGS is applicable only to farmer groups and works around the collective responsibility of the group.

The proposed Draft Regulations allow for the direct sale of “fresh organic produce” by producers or producer organisations to the end consumer without it having been certified. However, “processed food” is not exempt from the requirement of certification. This means that for any processed food to be sold as “organic” in Indian markets, it will have to be certified either by an agency under the Third Party Certification system or under PGS.

While both certification systems have a procedure for certification of processed food, practically, as of now, processed food certified under PGS is not a reality. The PGS guidelines allow certification of processed food as organic, only if the entire operation is carried out under the supervision of the PGS group of farmers (or a federation of few groups) and the items being processed are the direct produce of the group (or the groups forming the federation).In simple terms, for PGS-certified processed food, the raw produce must belong to the group of farmers and the processing must be undertaken under their supervision.

Amit Khurana, Senior Programme Manager, Food Safety and Toxins Unit, CSE says, “We understand that most PGS farmers are not undertaking any kind of processing and because they cannot not sell their produce for processing outside the group / federation, they are dealing only in fresh produce.” The sale of fresh organic food in India is already facing many challenges because of a lack of market linkages. As a result, farmers do not get the premium price they deserve for organic food and they are suffering, he adds.

Khurana said that the draft regulations could spell a lot of trouble if they became law, “If that happens, it will further eliminate any sale of PGS produce for processing outside the group and PGS farmers will be left with very limited options.”

One option could be to convert to the expensive system of Third Party Certification. But that too would be a futile move since it would only lead to the industry of certification agencies being promoted. Farmers who are unable to afford third party certification, might continue selling fresh produce despite the discouraging market situation, or worse, may quit organic farming. This adverse impact on the organic farming movement will lead to more food grown with the use of pesticides and other chemicals and will impact food safety in India.

Categories: NEWS

FSSAI committed to robust and unambiguous standards for food supplements

23,June, 2017 Leave a comment
 

Pawan Kumar Agarwal, Chief Executive Officer of the Food Safety and Standards Authority of India (FSSAI) said Thursday that the FSSAI is committed to ensuring robust and unambiguous standards for food supplements with the help of industry.

Addressing a FICCI seminar on Nutraceuticals – Seizing Growth Opportunities under Changing Economic and Regulatory Landscape held here today, Agarwal urged food processing industry players to work with the FSSAI on developing good manufacturing practices, document and adoption of it for overcoming challenges of spurious and dubious products flooding Indian markets.

Agarwal also mentioned that FSSAI is working with the central drug regulator to make a clear distinction between drug and food, which will clear a lot of ambiguity present among the stakeholders.

The other speakers in the inaugural session included Dr. B. Sesikeran, Chairman, Scientific Panel on Functional Foods, Nutraceuticals, Dietetic products and other similar products, FSSAI, Dr. A K Sharma, Consultant, FSSAI; Mr. Sanjaya Mariwala, Chairman, FICCI Task Force on Nutraceuticals and Managing Director and CEO, OmniActive Health Technologies Ltd; Mr. Sandeep Ahuja, Chairman, FICCI ? Wellness Committee and Executive Director, VLCC Healthcare Ltd and Dr. A Didar Singh, Secretary General, FICCI.

Dr. A Didar Singh emphasized the need for having standards for food products and how FICCI can collaboratively work with FSSAI to further expand the scope of standards beyond the current standards.

Sanjaya Mariwala highlighted the growth opportunities in Nutraceuticals and its contribution to Make in India initiative. He also invite industry member to work collaboratively on matters related to GST.

The seminar was attended by about 100 participants from the nutraceuticals industry.

Categories: NEWS

Many districts yet to comply with food safety rules

23,June, 2017 Leave a comment
 

Madurai: In an age when most people are utmost vigilant about the food they eat, its safety has assumed paramount importance. However, an RTI filed by a law student has picked several holes in the imposition of food safety act including low fines due to lack of sensitisation among the officials. The RTI also revealed that many districts in the state were yet to constitute district-level steering committees which are mandatory under the act on food safety.

R S Aafreen, a second year student of law, said that district revenue officers were designated as adjudicating officer under the FSSA with powers of a civil court for imposing penalties other than jail. Due to lack of sensitisation, the fine that has been imposed in many cases ranged from Rs 500 to Rs 5,000 though the act stipulates imposing fines ranging from Rs 1 lakh to Rs 10 lakh and imprisonment of up to six months

Aafreen had filed the RTI seeking the status of district-level steering committees in the 32 districts. The Tamil Nadu government order G.O (D) No 923 dated September 12, 2014 had directed officials to constitute food steering committees at the state as well as the district level under the Food Safety and Standards Act of 2006. District level food safety steering committees have to be constituted with the district collector as chairperson to monitor the food industry.

The RTI which was addressed to the state commissionerate got the district level officers to answer it but only 15 of the 32 officers have answered the query indicating the absence of the committees. As per the reply to the RTI, Dindigul, Madurai, Ramanathapuram, Salem and Virudhunagar districts did not furnish any reply to the formation of the steering committees.

The state had integrated the food safety wing of the directorate of public health and the department of drugs control administration and formed the Tamil Nadu Food Safety and Drug Administration under FSSA and Food Safety and Standards Rules, 2011. The food safety commissionerate of Tamil Nadu is one of the biggest departments in the country with 32 district designated officers, 580 food safety officers and supportive staff. However, the commissioner of food safety continues to hold multiple responsibilities.

It is specified that the district designated officer should have a medical degree and that the food safety officer (FSO) a degree in chemistry and allied subjects. Persons who are appointed as FSOs cannot be promoted to the next level of district designated officer as it needs a medical degree. This leads to a lack of motivation among them.

The annual report of 2013-2014 of the department says that the 580 FSOs had collected only 658 legal samples and that cases were filed against only 61 traders and the total penalty imposed during the entire year was only Rs 5.7 lakhs while the food commissionerate gets over Rs 50 crore annually for its functioning. The annual report says that Rs 35 lakh was collected as penalty in 203 cases in the year 2014-2015.

Categories: NEWS